(via BibliOdyssey: Taishō Posters)
‘This monthly print journal began as an advertising medium for Young & McCallister, one of the largest print and advertising firms in Los Angeles in the early 20th century.’ (via Letterology: The Needle Makes a Fine Point for Printing)

‘This monthly print journal began as an advertising medium for Young & McCallister, one of the largest print and advertising firms in Los Angeles in the early 20th century.’ (via Letterology: The Needle Makes a Fine Point for Printing)

‘This monthly print journal began as an advertising medium for Young & McCallister, one of the largest print and advertising firms in Los Angeles in the early 20th century.’ (via Letterology: The Needle Makes a Fine Point for Printing)

‘This monthly print journal began as an advertising medium for Young & McCallister, one of the largest print and advertising firms in Los Angeles in the early 20th century.’ (via Letterology: The Needle Makes a Fine Point for Printing)

“The most recent acquisition in my Cries of London collection is a second edition of Charles Hindley’s History of the Cries of London, Ancient & Modern from 1884.” (via Charles Hindley’s Cries Of London | Spitalfields Life)

‘Auction House description:
Exceedingly Rare and Important Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Face Jug, Virginia origin, third quarter 19th century, narrow, cylindrical jug with tooled spout, applied handle, and salt-glazed surface, the front decorated with a large applied man’s face with clay “coleslaw” beard.’ (via Anonymous Works: 19th Century Stoneware Face Jug)

‘Auction House description:
Exceedingly Rare and Important Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Face Jug, Virginia origin, third quarter 19th century, narrow, cylindrical jug with tooled spout, applied handle, and salt-glazed surface, the front decorated with a large applied man’s face with clay “coleslaw” beard.’ (via Anonymous Works: 19th Century Stoneware Face Jug)

cmog:

Dropper flask, Roman Empire, probably Syria, 200-299. (via Dropper Flask | Corning Museum of Glass)

cmog:

Dropper flask, Roman Empire, probably Syria, 200-299. (via Dropper Flask | Corning Museum of Glass)